Health and Wellness

Health and Wellness

 

CANCER

Cancer is a term used for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other tissues. Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems.

Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for the organ or type of cell in which they start – for example, cancer that begins in the colon is called colon cancer; cancer that begins in melanocytes of the skin is called melanoma. (Credit: National Cancer Institute)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Cancer Information & Prevention
As a leader in nationwide efforts to ease the burden of cancer, CDC works with national cancer organizations, state health agencies and other key groups to develop, implement and promote effective strategies for preventing and controlling cancer.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/

National Cancer Institute
The National Cancer Institute coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research, training and health information dissemination. It also assists other programs on the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients.
http://www.cancer.gov/

OBESITY

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person’s weight is greater than what’s considered healthy for his or her height.

Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods and not being physically active.

Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even five to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. (Credit: NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Overweight & Obesity
CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) is working to implement policy and environmental strategies to make healthy eating and active living accessible and affordable for everyone.
http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/index.html

MedlinePlus
MedlinePlus provides in-depth information on overweight and obesity, including diagnosis/symptoms, related issues, clinical trials, and prevention/screening.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/obesity.html

Childhood Overweight and Obesity
Obesity now affects 17% of all children and adolescents in the United States – triple the rate from just one generation ago.
http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/index.html

DIABETES

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose or blood sugar levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes.

A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed.  (Credit: NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases – Diabetes Information Clearinghouse 
Fact sheets, booklets, resources, and more for people recently diagnosed and on diabetes management, prevention of complications, and prediabetes.
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Diabetes Public Health Resource
CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation translates diabetes research into daily practice to understand the impact of the disease, influence health outcomes, and improve access to quality health care.
http://CDC.gov/diabetes/index.htm

The health and safety of Chickasaws, employees and patrons is our main priority. As the coronavirus, or COVID-19, spreads globally and cases rise in the U.S., some Chickasaw Nation events, classes, facilities, etc., will be postponed, closed or canceled out of an abundance of caution. For more information regarding the coronavirus as it relates to the Chickasaw Nation, please visit our Chickasaw Nation website. We will continue to update these pages regularly as the situation progresses. Thank you for your understanding during this time.Visit Chickasaw Nation Website