Eye Care

Eye Care

Eye Diseases
An overview from the National Library of Medicine on common eye problems, including information and tools on eye anatomy, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
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Diabetic Retinopathy
High blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes can often damage eyes. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your retina and is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Read for information from the National Library of Medicine on Diabetic Retinopathy.
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Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the U.S. In glaucoma, the fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises and damages the optic nerve. Read on for references, tools and prevention tips from the National Library of Medicine.
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Macular Degeneration
Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 or older. The macula is the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. Read descriptions of wet AMD and dry AMD on MedlinePlus, and how they can be detected with regular comprehensive eye exams.
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Cataracts
Very common in older Americans, a cataract is a clouding of the lens in your eye. It often develops slowly and can occur in either or both eyes. A comprehensive resource from the National Library of Medicine on cataracts.
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Dry Eyes
Dry eyes occur when your tears do not provide adequate moisture for your eyes. Read about symptoms, potential causes, treatments and prevention tips from the Mayo Clinic.
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Floaters
Floaters are small, dark, shadowy shapes resembling spots, strands or squiggly lines that float about in your field of vision. Visit the National Eye Institute resource site for information and links on floaters.
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Flashes and Floaters
This information was developed by the National Eye Institute to help patients and their families search for general information about floaters. An eye care professional who has examined the patient’s eyes and is familiar with his or her medical history is the best person to answer specific questions.
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Retinal Disorders
The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. Retinal disorders affect vital tissue and can affect vision. The National Library of Medicine provides information and resources on retinal disorders.
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Amblyopia
Amblyopia refers to the reduction of vision in one of the eyes when the eye and brain are not properly working together. Visit the National Eye Institute website for more information and research articles on amblyopia.
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Ocular Migraine
Migraine with aura is a migraine that is preceded or accompanied by sensory warning signs or symptoms, in the form of temporary visual or sensory disturbances. Read more from the Mayo Clinic on signs and symptoms of ocular migraines, what you can expect from your doctor, and treatments.
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Migraine
Migraines are recurring attacks of moderate to severe pain, during which people can become very sensitive to light and sound. The National Library from Medicine provides information on migraines, including how they related to eye health.
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Sty
A sty, known as a hordeolum, is a red, painful lump near the edge of the eyelid. While most sties are harmless, the Mayo Clinic provides symptoms, causes, and treatment information.
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Eye Infections
Eye infections can be caused by bacteria, fungi or viruses and occur in different parts of the eye. This MedlinePlus resource explains types of eye infections along with their symptoms and other related information.
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Refractive Errors
Refractive errors are vision problems that occur when the shape of your eye prevents you from focusing well. Common refractive errors include myopia, hyperopia, presbyopia and astigmatism. Read more from the National Library of Medicine on refractive errors.
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